Thymus_serpyllum_bd4_tafel_055

fille

noun, f., n-decl., 8 occ.

Type: plant

Last Update: 26.08.2011 10:34

Old-English: fil, fille, cerfille, fillan,

Latin (Machine generated): CERPILLUM, CERUILLUM, SERPELLIM, SERPILLUM,

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References Last Update: 25.09.2020 15:00

Meanings Last Update: 13.05.2011 10:45

  • A: plant: native
    Thymus serpyllum L., breckland thyme, Sand-Thymian
  • B: plant: foreign Not recorded in Clapham, Stace (1985,569) labeles 'introduced'; a source on the Internet (http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/madaus/thymus.html) specifyes wihtout giving references: "Thymian ist wohl erst im 11. Jahrhundert über die Alpen gebracht w
    Thymus vulgaris L., common thyme, Echter Thymian
  • C: plant: introduced Probably by Romans? (Cf. http://www.frontiercoop.com/products.php?cn=Chervil%20Leaf&ct=spicesaz).
    Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm., garden chervil, Garten-Kerbel
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Comments Last Update: 13.05.2011 10:48

  • Comment on (A): Thymus serpyllum L., breckland thyme, Sand-Thymian

    Cf. Dur 111 and the respective note: "CERUILLUM ist sicher aus SERPYLLUM (gr. έρπνλλος) entstellt, dem Namen, den die Römer für den Feldthymian' kannten (FB S.135). Die korrekte Form erscheint bei Aelfric S. 311,9 SERPILLUM: fille." Pettit (2001, glossary) suggests wild thyme (Thymus praecox Opitz subsp. arcticus (Durand) Jalas) as other possible native thyme species.

  • Comment on (B): Thymus vulgaris L., common thyme, Echter Thymian

    The name →wudufille, which is also recorded in LA implies that wild and cultivated plants were differently named. The plant name →fille, reade, T. serpyllum because of its rose coloured flowers, indicates that different species were distinguished; T. vulgaris has white flowers. The name →wudu-fille, reade does not contradict this interpretation.

  • Comment on (C): Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm., garden chervil, Garten-Kerbel

    Cf. Epinal-Erfurt, 246 (CEREFOLIUM cunillae) and Pheifer's note (1974,76): "Cunillae = 'wild thyme' (L. CUNILA), not CEREFOIUM 'chervil'; CER(E)FOLIUM, -FILLON [...] may have been confused with SERPYLLON (cf. 895), or with OE. fille 'wild thyme' as in Dur. 111 CERUILLUM fille (Brown, C 244)." In the Nine Herbs Charm fille is probably used to denote A. cerefolium to sustain the alliteration. For other identifications cf. Pritzel / Jessen (1967,401): "Mittalt. CRASSINA, CUNILAGO, SERPILLUM, indess mit SATUREIA, KONELE, sowie mit Pimpinella carvi Kümmel und Anthriscus cere­folium Kerbel vielfach vermengt." Also cf. Napier's note on 56,38: "Cp. 416 [=CERPILLUM, ceruille] - CERPILLUM = CHÆREPHYLLUM = χαιρέφνλλον." Pettit (2001,LXXVI, 570) doubts this identification and suggests 'A. caucalis Bieb., bur-chervil, Hunds-Kerbel', a wild species; he also refutes Cameron (1993, 147), who suggests Chaerophyllum aureum L. (introduced), or Chaerophyllum temulum L. (rough chervil, native), or (hesitantly) Myrrhis odorata L. (sweet cicely, native).

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Occurrences Last Update: 22.07.2009 12:07

  • C 28, Na 56, 38 CERPILLUM[1] fil[2]
  • Dur, 111 CERUILLUM fille
  • LA, 154/3[3] nsg fille
  • LA, 156/9[4] nsg fille
  • Æ, 311,9 SERPILLUM fille
  • Æ(C), 311,9 CERPILLUM[5] fil
  • Æ(F), 311,9 SERPELLIM fille
  • Æ(O), 311,9 CERPILLUM[6] fil
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Images Last Update: 26.08.2011 10:34

Thymus serpyllum L., breckland thyme, Sand-Thymian

Thymus_serpyllum_bd4_tafel_055

Botanical-Information: stylised plate

Source: →reference-information

Thomé, Otto Wilhelm. Flora von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz. In 4 Mappen ; 531 Tafeln in naturgetreuen Farben mit 668 Pflanzenarten. Leipzip: Teubner, 1938.

Thymus vulgaris L., common thyme, Echter Thymian

Thymus_vulgaris

Botanical-Information: stylised plate

Source: →reference-information

Krauss, Johann Carl. Afbeeldingen der artseny-gewassen met dervelver Nederduitsche en Latynsche beschryvingen. 3. deel. Amsterdam: J. C. Sepp en Zoon, 1796.

Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm., garden chervil, Garten-Kerbel

Anthriscus_cerefolium_bd3_tafel_065

Botanical-Information: stylised plate

Source: →reference-information

Thomé, Otto Wilhelm. Flora von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz. In 4 Mappen ; 531 Tafeln in naturgetreuen Farben mit 668 Pflanzenarten. Leipzip: Teubner, 1938.

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Research Literature

AldVNa: Napier, Arthur Sampson. Old English Glosses. Anecdota Oxoniensia, Mediaeval and Modern Series. 11. Reprint of Oxford, Clarendon Press 1900. Hildesheim: Olms, 1969.
BW II: Bierbaumer, Peter. Der botanische Wortschatz des Altenglischen. Grazer Beiträge zur Englischen Philologie 2. Bern, Frankfurt am Main, München: Lang, 1976.
BW III: Bierbaumer, Peter. Der botanische Wortschatz des Altenglischen. Grazer Beiträge zur Englischen Philologie 3. Frankfurt am Main, Bern, Las Vegas: Lang, 1979.
DOE: Cameron, Angus, Ashley Crandell Amos, Antonette di Paolo Healey, et al. (eds.). Dictionary of Old English (A to G). CD-Rom. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies for the Dictionary of Old English Project, 2008.
Dur: Lindheim, B. von. Das Durhamer Pflanzenglossar. Beiträge zur englischen Philologie. 35. Bochum-Langendreer: Pöppinghaus, 1941.
Ep, Erf: Pheifer, J.D. (ed.). Old English Glosses in the Epinal-Erfurt Glossary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1974.
LA, Lor: Grattan, John Henry Grafton, and Charles Singer. Anglo-Saxon Magic and Medicine. London: Oxford Univ. Press, 1952.
LA: Cockayne, Oswald Thomas (ed.). "[Lacnunga] Recipies." In: Leechdoms, Wortcunning and Starcraft of Early England. Being a Collection of Documents, for the Most Part never before Printed, Illustrating the History of Sience in this Country before the Norman Conquest. Vol. 3. Rev. Ed. by Charles Singer. London: Holland Press, 1961. 2-81.
LB: Leonhardi, Günther. Kleinere angelsächsische Denkmäler I. Bibliothek der ags. Prosa VI. Hamburg: Grand, 1905.
Cameron, Malcolm Lawrence. Anglo-Saxon Medicine. Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England. 7. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
Grein, Christian-Wilhelm-Michael (ed.). Bibliothek der angelsächsischen Poesie. Göttingen: Wigand, 1864.
MS London, British Library, Harley 585.
MS Oxford, St John's College, 154.
MS Durham, Cathedral, Hunter 100.
Pettit, Edward, (ed. and trans.). Anglo-Saxon Remedies, Charms and Prayers from British Library MS Harley 585: the 'Lacnunga'. Vol. I: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Appendices. Vol. II: Commentary and Bibliography. Mellen Critical Editions and Translations. 6A and 6B. Lewiston, Queenston and Lampeter: Mellen, 2001.
Pritzel, Georg und Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Jessen. Die deutschen Volksnamen der Pflanzen. Neudr. der Ausg.Hannover 1882. Amsterdam: Schippers, 1967.
Sauer, Hans. Patterns of loan-influence on the Medieval English plant names, with special reference to the influence of Greek. In: Foreign Influences on Medieval English, Eds. Jacek Fisiak, and Magdalana Bator. Studies in English medieval language and literature. 28. Frankfurt/Main: Lang, 2011. 55-76.
Storms, Godfrid (ed.). Anglo-Saxon Magic. Reprint of the 1948 ed. published by M. Nijhoff, The Hague. Norwood, Pa: Norwood Editions, 1975.
[1]:

In BTS, s.v. fille this form is wrongly recorded as CESPILLUM.

[2]:

L. fille; in C 28 many glosses are fragmentary.

[3]:

Nine Herbs Charm: "fille 7 finule". Grattan / Singer translate "[Cher]vil and fennel"; Bonser (1963,339), Storms (1975,189), and Hoops (1889,59) have this identification, too.

[4]:

"fille 7 finul"; Grattan / Singer translate "chervil and fennel".

[5]:

See note on C28, Na 56,38.

[6]:

See note on C28, Na 56,38.